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Friday, 3 June 2011

SOMETHING FOR THOUGHT AND DISCUSSION?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/wondermonkey/2011/06/who-are-the-thugs-in-british-w.shtml


3 comments:

Bruce said...

I for one would miss the brambles especially in autumn. Our ivy hosts bees and many other invertebrates, but bracken.....

Philip said...

A flawed report of the original research. The reason there is quantatively more damage (their words not mine), to woods by Brambles than Rhodo, is because brambles are ubiquitous, whereas Rhodo is not. It is a nonsense report to anyone who actually works in a wood, rather than mathematically studies it. Brambles are one of the most useful components of a wood. They provide the niche where tree seedlings can grow. They are not difficult to get rid of if required. Just cut them back. The resultant soil tilth when they are removed is ideal for plants to seed into. As for Rhodo, nothing survives in its presence and it is a sporulating host for Phytopthera ramorum. The BBC should perhaps be more concerned with people dumping all their garden arisings onto wild flower verges etc. and killing wild flora with the consequent mulching.

Bruce said...

Good comment Philip.
Rhododendrons are really invasive. There was a blitz on them at Ogden LNR a few years ago but they a back again.